Gananoque Gathers in Remembrance of All Who Served

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Faces of All Ages Came Out to Pay Tribute

By Lorraine Payette, written November 13, 2013

(GANANOQUE, ONTARIO) The rain fell like icy tears, splattering camera lenses and chilling participants as Gananoque gathered in Town Park on November 11 to celebrate Remembrance Day. – to read more>

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492 Military Police Army Cadets Well Into a Successful Year

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by Lorraine Payette, written October 8, 2013

(GANANOQUE, ON) – The 492 Military Police Army Cadets in Gananoque are in full swing after having held a very successful Recruitment Barbecue on September 11. Now that the excitement of joining up, the fun of seeing your friends join, too, is over, it’s time for the work to begin.

Kate Andrews, formerly known as CWO Andrews, assisted with training through most of the month of September as a civilian volunteer. – to read more>

492 Military Police Army Cadets Hosting Registration and Barbecue

492 Military Police Army Cadets

492 Military Police Army Cadets

by Lorraine Payette, written on September 5, 2013

(GANANOQUE, ONTARIO) The Number 492 Military Police Canadian Army Cadet Corps is hosting a free barbecue at its annual registration being held on Wednesday, September 11, starting at 6:30 p.m. The event takes place at the Lou Jeffries Recreation Centre on King Street East in Gananoque. The program is for kids between the ages of 12 and 18. A birth certificate and OHIP card are needed for registration.

Police and Provost services have existed in many of the world’s armies since the time of Augustus Caesar (27 BC – 14 AD) or earlier. While relatively new to the Canadian Army, they were used to assist in managing the large armies that existed at that time, helping to keep order and deliver dispatches. The Canadian Military Police Corps came about during World War I in October of 1917, and were connected with the RCMP. Time passed, and in 1963 it was decided to amalgamate the Royal Canadian Navy (Shore Patrol), the Army (Provost Corps) and the Royal Canadian Air Force Police. These units came together to be the Military Police Branch. – to read more>

Number 492 Military Police Canadian Army Cadet Corps Holds Annual Review in Gananoque

by Lorraine Payette, written May 22, 2013

(GANANOQUE, ONTARIO) The Number 492 Military Police Canadian Army Cadet Corps made sure they had all their boots spit shined, buttons polished, every hair in place and every uniform spotless as they came together for their annual parade and review at the Gananoque Recreation Centre on May 22. – to read more>

Army Cadets Stand Vigil for 66th Anniversary of Vimy Ridge

Cadets from Gananoque’s 492 Military Police Royal Canadian (Army) Cadet Corps stand vigil at the cenotaph in the Town Park in Gananoque in honour of the memory of those troops who fought so nobly at Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917

Cadets from Gananoque’s 492 Military Police Royal Canadian (Army) Cadet Corps stand vigil at the cenotaph in the Town Park in Gananoque in honour of the memory of those troops who fought so nobly at Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917

by Lorraine Payette, written April 13, 2013

(GANANOQUE, ONTARIO) In honour of the memory of those troops who fought so nobly at Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917, the Cadets from Gananoque’s 492 Military Police Royal Canadian (Army) Cadet Corps chose to stand a vigil at the cenotaph in the Town Park in Gananoque on April 13, the 66th anniversary of the battle.

“No Allied operation on the Western Front was more thoroughly planned than this deliberate frontal attack on what seemed to be virtually invincible positions,” reports Canada at War. “Vimy Ridge was so well fortified that all previous attempts to capture it had failed. However, Canadian commanders had learned bitter lessons from the cost of past frontal assaults made by vulnerable infantry. This time their preparations were elaborate. As the Canadian Commander of the 1st Division, Major-General Arthur Currie, said, ‘Take time to train them.’ This is exactly what the Canadian Corps did, down to the smallest unit and the individual soldier.” – to read more>